Developers in California won’t let inclusionary zoning case rest

I have been away from this blog for so long, part of me fears I have forgotten to write well about affordable housing. Still, life has reached a stabilizing point for me in the past week or so and I realized I am becoming restless without writing here. And so, to welcome what I hope […]

Affordable housing in the news

I haven’t written a new post in weeks. This is in part due to an unusually busy schedule but also (and probably mostly) in part to the lack of connection I have felt lately to this blog. I still care passionately about affordable housing, but I haven’t been able to muster interest in research and […]

The difficulty of obtaining a government ID, especially while homeless

In the District of Columbia, as Kathryn Baer of Poverty & Policy explains in a recent post, securing an official ID as a homeless person (without an address, proof of residency, utility bills, etc) is a near impossible burden and requires systems of support that are often beyond the reach of homeless people. And yet, […]

Monthly Roundup: Five stories in the news

After a long break, here is my newest roundup of the month’s most enticing, infuriating, discussion-worthy news stories! I have always enjoyed these posts, since they give me time to reflect on my recent reading and to share my thoughts on multiple aspects of affordable housing. Please let me know in the comments about your favorite compelling […]

Housing vs. Community Garden: which is the more valuable use of land?

A few months ago I read about a housing development proposed for construction on the site of the community-run Elizabeth Street Garden in New York City and was struck (as I often am) by how one good choice often comes at the expense of another. I support both housing and community spaces (especially gardens) and […]

Illinois cannot afford to fund social services without a budget

Illinois has yet to pass a budget for the current fiscal year, which began on July 1. As a result, reserves are running low and social service organizations are going unfunded, despite court orders. Comptroller Leslie Munger’s office says they simply do not have enough money to write checks to everyone effected by the shortages. […]

Bipartisan support for using Fannie Mae/ Freddie Mac profits to fund affordable rental housing

Barney Frank’s latest article in the Portland Press Herald describes the virtues of a new bill proposed by Senator Susan Collins (R. -Maine) regarding the use of profits gleaned from Fannie Mae/ Freddie Mac. The two agencies, responsible for providing government-backed mortgages, are still in conservatorship. Profits do not go to shareholders, but to U.S. Treasury. These […]

Vote for affordable housing projects!

Affordable Housing Finance (AHF), an online magazine that covers affordable housing projects throughout the country, is about to close voting on its annual Reader’s Choice Awards. The contest is broken into nine categories, with 34 projects total projects in competition. Eligible developments were either completed in 2014 or will be completed in 2015. Each entry […]

Affordable housing fights in Hoboken

Hoboken’s affordable housing ordinance (enacted in 1988) has been upheld by an appellate court, making it mandatory for developers to designate ten percent of new homes per housing development as affordable. Just as when California’s Supreme Court upheld a similar ordinance in San Jose, developers are outraged. The case came to court after the Fair Share […]

Keeping the Promise Ordinance in Chicago’s City Council today

The Chicago Housing Initiative and supporting Aldermen are introducing the Keeping the Promise Ordinance to Chicago’s City Council today. The Ordinance will create oversight and accountability for the Chicago Housing Authority (CHA) by requiring the CHA to report to the Council on a quarterly basis; to replace each demolished unit with another unit on a one-for-one basis […]